Curriculum Summaries by Grade

Preschool

Integrated Preschool Curriculum Summary

These curriculum summaries have been developed by teachers and administrators to serve as another way of communicating with parents.  They highlight the core curriculum and expectations for student learning at each grade level.

The curriculum summaries describe what most students at a grade level are expected to know and be able to do by the end of the school year.  They also reflect the goals of the various Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  It is important to note that although children may learn and grow at different rates and through varied styles, all should make regular progress.

While we have high expectations for all students and encourage each student to work to their capacity, parents and teachers recognize that some students have more difficulty in school.  Others will progress more rapidly and move well beyond these core expectations.  It is the joint responsibility of school and home to provide support, challenge, and encouragement for all students.

Integrated Preschool: A Philosophical Statement

The Hingham Integrated Preschool includes both typically developing children and children with disabilities from the ages of 3-5. The program is language based and activities are designed to address the appropriate developmental level of each child. Through the use of hands-on experiences, the curriculum areas of speech and language, motor development, readiness skills, social/emotional and self-help skills are targeted. Since children have different learning styles and are at different developmental levels, each activity is adapted to the individual needs of each child.

Our goal is for children to participate in activities at his or her own level. We want each child to feel included, successful, and good about him or herself. The fostering of self-esteem and the promotion of tolerance and acceptance of other people is foremost in the philosophy of the Hingham Integrated Preschool.

Mission Statement

The purpose of the Hingham Integrated Preschool is to educate children with disabilities and their typically developing peers within a comprehensive, structured language-based program. In alignment with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks the program will provide the support, structure and respectful school environment necessary for children to master pre-academic, communication and social/emotional standards, while also meeting the individual needs of each child. Staff will collaborate with parents to support the children’s learning and progress. Children with disabilities are given additional support as directed by their IEPs. This is provided by not only the preschool staff but also the speech/language therapist, occupational therapist, and physical therapist in an integrated service learning approach.

English Language Arts

The foundations for learning in the English Language Arts are critical to all other curriculum areas as well as to the child’s social and emotional development. Children develop the basis for verbal communication in early childhood, beginning with nonverbal social exchanges. They begin to appreciate literature and the joy of reading by being read to in family and early care/education settings. A solid foundation in language development in the years before a child enters school promotes success in reading and writing in the future. The preschool program encourages children to learn about the world around them. The key components include book orientation, asking and answering questions, sequencing, and relating personal experience to stories. Built into the preschool program are interactive writing and cross-curricular activities. Drop Everything and Write is the handwriting program which is emphasized using a manuscript alphabet made from five simple starting strokes.

Mathematics

Mathematics relates to ideas and concepts about quantity and addresses logical and spatial relationships. At the preschool level, the foundations of mathematical understanding are formed out of children’s concrete experiences. Mathematical experiences are not limited to “math time.” They are embedded in almost all daily classroom activities. Mathematical thinking is incorporated into block play, dramatic play, sand and water play, and outdoor play. Children also have the opportunity to make connections between mathematics and musical experiences or art by exploring rhythmic or visual patterns or symmetry. Preschool children learn to recite numbers in order, compare quantity, comprehend position, recognize and create simple patterns, identify simple shapes, and match objects in one-to-one correspondence. Number concepts become significant to children when they develop out of experiences that are functional in their world. Preschool activities can build their understanding of number concepts, and also build foundations for understanding characteristics and properties of 2-and 3-dimensional geometric shapes.

Science and Technology/Engineering

Young children are naturally curious. They wonder what things are called, how they work, and why things happen. The foundations of scientific learning lie in inquiry and exploration. The younger the children, the simpler and more concrete the activities need to be. Pre-K students focus on experiencing and making observations of the world around them. They are beginning to learn about their own environment as they observe plants and animals, the Moon and the Sun, and the daily weather. They experience their world through their senses and body parts and begin to recognize that animals also use their senses and body parts to meet their basic needs. In all activities, children are encouraged to use the precise language of science. The skills and processes of inquiry and exploration are fundamental to all the sciences. Specific objectives include predicting, observing, comparing, and classifying by attributes

History and Social Science

At the early childhood level, learning in history and social science is built on children’s experiences in their families, school, community, state, and country. Preschoolers can explore beginning concepts of history and social sciences with questions that are important to their lives, such as “Who are the members of my family?” “Where do we live?” and “Who are our neighbors?” Themes include “all about me,” community helpers, and transportation.  Meaningful topics around social studies often emerge spontaneously out of children’s play and conversations, and teachers provide materials and resources to help children further explore their interests or questions. A second purpose of the preschool curriculum is to begin the development of their civic identities. Children listen to stories about the people and events we celebrate in our national holidays and learn why we celebrate them.

Health

In the preschool years, brain and body development are critically linked. It is through physical activity and body movement that the brain internalizes the foundations of laterality (left, right), directionality (up, down, in, out), and position in space (over, under, behind). These concepts are critical to mathematical thinking as well as to beginning reading and writing. They lay the basis for the child to “see” how letters are formed and put together in patterns called words, and to translate this understanding into symbols on paper in the form of writing. Children are encouraged to engage routinely in block building, or other spatial and manipulative activities, as well as in music, art, dramatic play, and language activities, in order to stimulate both sides of the brain. At the preschool level, there is  strong emphasis on both gross and fine motor development activities. Developing the large muscles will give support to the small muscles in the hands and fingers. Outdoor play is an integral part of the daily curriculum, all year and in all seasons, and should be viewed as an opportunity for learning. Activities that promote sound physical development help children develop both skills and confidence in using their bodies and the equipment they play with. Socially, preschool children are moving into a wider circle of relationships with peers and with adults other than family members. Many children need to learn how to play in a group setting. Three-year olds are egocentric and have a hard time waiting for a turn. Four-year olds who have had some experience in groups may be aware of group expectations but still need to be reminded of rules and routines. Preschool children need guidance to develop the ability to share, take turns, lead, follow, and be a friend. Emotionally, the young child’s growing independence involves taking gradual steps away from the security of an adult’s presence and protection and fulfilling the drive toward separateness and individuality. The foundations for children’s confidence in themselves, their relationships with other children, as well as their trust in the adults who teach and care for them, are influenced, if not established, in early childhood. Children need to feel safe in order to feel free to explore, and they need meaningful feedback from significant adults who delight in their successes and reassure them in their failures. As they begin to exercise independence, it is important to allow children sufficient time to work on tasks until they are satisfied with the results.

The Arts

The goal of arts education for young children is to develop and sustain the natural curiosity, expressiveness, and creativity that very young children often display. Arts education begins with a foundation that emphasizes exploration, experimentation, and engagement of the senses, and discussion as paths to understanding. Young children use the arts to explore sensation and their understanding of real and imagined events. They try to find out all they can about the expressive qualities inherent in different forms of communication. Through what they choose to dramatize, sing, or paint, children let others know what is important, trivial, appealing, or frightening in their lives. Depictions of faces and forms develop fairly predictably in young children. Although “realistic” products should not be the goal, preschool-age children can learn some basic techniques and begin to develop aesthetic preferences.

Additional Information

Preschool Website

Questions about grade level curriculum should be directed first to your child’s teacher.  The principal or assistant principal may provide additional information.

Preschool Contacts

East School

Hingham Public Schools Superintendent’ Office

Comments about this document may be directed to Elizabeth Costanza at [email protected] or 781-741-1570.

Kindergarten

Kindergarten Curriculum Summary

These curriculum summaries have been developed by teachers and administrators to serve as another way of communicating with parents. They highlight the core curriculum and expectations for student learning at each grade level.

The curriculum summaries describe what most students at a grade level are expected to know and be able to do by the end of the school year. They also reflect the goals of the various Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. It is important to note that although children may learn and grow at different rates and through varied styles, all should make regular progress.

While we have high expectations for all students and encourage each student to work to their capacity, parents and teachers recognize that some students have more difficulty in school. Others will progress more rapidly and move well beyond these core expectations. It is the joint responsibility of school and home to provide support, challenge, and encouragement for all students.

Kindergarten: A Philosophical Statement

In the Hingham Public Schools, kindergarten philosophy places importance in the success and well-being of each child; intellectually, emotionally, socially and physically.  The curriculum addresses both the cognitive and affective domains.  Children are exposed to a wide variety and high frequency of learning opportunities in all modalities.  Children and teachers work together from the very first day to promote a solid reading and writing foundation.  Our kindergarten curriculum is aligned to the standards in the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.  The Hingham Public Schools has updated the social studies, reading, writing and math materials to correspond to our new higher standards.  Early intervention strategies are an important tool in kindergarten.  Teachers and support staff carefully analyze any learning difficulties that may surface and provide differentiated instruction.  A concluding goal of kindergarten in Hingham is that each child will be engaged in the joy of learning and equipped with the confidence, enthusiasm and skills needed for a positive school experience.

Supplementary Information

Kindergarten children need:

  • a large, labeled backpack (without wheels).
  • a snack they can manage by themselves. Lunch may be purchased.
  • outerwear appropriate to the weather.

School to home communication is typically via the child’s backpack. It is important to check daily for notes, notices, or other information. Parent to teacher contact is most easily handled by a note in the backpack.

Parent  Conferences

Parent conferences are held on specific early release days which are indicated on the school calendar.  Parents may schedule individual appointments to learn about their child’s progress.  Conferences may be initiated by the teacher or the parent.

Kindergarten  Timeline

Spring:

  • official registration packets picked up and returned to schools (March)
  • evening parent orientation night at each school (May)
  • sneak-a-peek short student visit

Summer:

  • parent letter indicating teacher assignment and “meet and greet” day/time
  • bus routes posted in local press

September:

  • school begins for all students
  • kindergarten bus orientation/”meet and greet” prior to the start of the kindergarten year
  • kindergarten screening conducted during the first month of school

January/February:

  • kindergarten progress reports sent home with students

Assessment 

Kindergarten student progress reports are issued twice per year. Students are assessed using DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) in order to identify necessary and appropriate intervention techniques to help children achieve given benchmarks. Literacy portfolios and math folders contain samples of classroom assessments and other student work.

Health/Social-Emotional Development 

The elementary health curriculum is designed to promote an understanding and awareness of sound health and safety practices and development of independence, responsibility, and social skills. Study focuses on the individual, the family, and the community. Major themes are: common health habits; safety; nutrition; social/emotional development. Kindergarten students will participate in the Toolbox program designed to develop self-regulation and social-emotional skills.  Students also participate in the Second Step program which includes lessons on empathy, emotion management and problem solving. Typical learning opportunities are: socio-dramatic play; snack preparation and cooking; teacher modeling of respectful interactions; conflict resolution; sharing and getting along with others; self-concept development; daily hygiene reminders; and classroom safety and physical fitness practices. Special presentations by other specialists complement classroom teacher instruction in health.

Mathematics

The curriculum of the Hingham Public Schools is aligned with and based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics. Mathematics learning activities for kindergarten are often integrated into the children’s daily routine. An activity-based approach where children begin to recognize the role of mathematics in their daily lives is stressed. Specific content objectives are taught using a variety of manipulatives and a sensory approach based on Everyday Mathematics (Wright Group). Students completing kindergarten are in the process of acquiring the following skills and concepts at a concrete level: one-to-one counting; measuring, estimating, and comparing size and number; classifying, sorting, and graphing using a variety of characteristics (size, shape, color, etc.); building or completing sequences and patterns; developing number sense and relationships; discussing and recognizing geometry, practicing with geometric shapes, symbols, time, calendar, and money applications; exploring numeral writing; recognizing parts of a whole (fraction); and engaging in problem solving activities.

Literacy  (Reading and Writing)

Kindergarten provides the foundation for students to become successful and enthusiastic readers.  The kindergarten literacy program stresses a continuum of skills and strategies necessary for emergent reading and writing. Core instruction is delivered through the 2017 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Journeys Reading Program, key components of which include instruction in print awareness, phonological awareness, phonics and decoding, comprehension, vocabulary, and writing. Beginning reading concepts are enhanced by attention to skills in listening, speaking, viewing and representing. “Big books” for shared reading lessons emphasize concepts about print as well as enjoyment of literature while “little books” are used for differentiated instruction. Instruction is also supported by numerous print and digital resources. Built into the program are interactive writing and cross-curricular activities. Key concepts are presented to students in whole-class format while Response to Intervention (RTI) practices allow individual needs to be met in small skill-based groups and through learning center activities. Students are assessed using DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) in order to identify necessary and appropriate intervention techniques. In addition, a district-wide digital assessment system for literacy (ESGI) evaluates student progress in skills targeted by both the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the core reading program. Students are introduced to the primary forms of writing in the expository, opinion, and narrative modes. Kindergarten students are taught a handwriting program that features a vertical manuscript alphabet made from four simple, continuous strokes.

Science

The kindergarten science program includes formal hands-on science units as well as informally taught concepts and information that reflects the interests and ideas generated by the child’s natural curiosity. Science at this level is often integrated with literature and social studies. Using the natural curiosity that young children have about the world around them, kindergartners conduct investigations that relate to themes of weather and climate, including measuring temperature and observing its effects on different materials.  Children investigate forces and motion of objects by changing the strength and direction of pushes & pulls.  Throughout the seasons, they explore how plants and animals grow and change.  Specific objectives include: fostering of curiosity, interest, and enthusiasm for science; observing and comparing various characteristics; making quantitative observations that help them identify why changes occur; and using evidence to support a claim. 

Social Studies

The social studies curriculum in kindergarten incorporates the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for History/Social Science, as well as English Language Arts and Literacy.

It begins with focusing on a young child’s emerging self-identity at home and school.

The kindergarten program revolves around four central themes:

1) All about me;

2) The best I can be;

3) Living, learning and working together; and

4) Where I am.

The above themes stress interpersonal relationships and the importance of cooperation at home, school, and in the community. Children explore the traditions of various holidays and how they are celebrated today. They identify national symbols and songs that promote a common national pride. Individuals who changed our country in significant ways are introduced, as well as our national heritage. Children will begin to understand that it is everyone’s responsibility to protect the Earth and recognize that the world is a large place where people must communicate to work for a common good. Instead of relying on a standard kindergarten kit or textbook, teachers identify resources from a wide range of sources. Key themes are integrated through our literacy program and other disciplines, as social studies is taught through a multidisciplinary approach.

Foreign  Language

The objective of the elementary Spanish program is to create a foundation from which students can develop basic communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as an appreciation for the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will acquire vocabulary that is useful in their everyday world,  learn conversational phrases and expressions in context, develop an understanding of the Spanish alphabet and phonetic system, and  be well-prepared to study Spanish or French at the middle school. 

In Kindergarten, our students will learn to:

  • greet others, respond to greetings, and say goodbye
  • identify colors in Spanish
  • count from 1-10 in Spanish
  • identify the days of the week, months of the year, and seasons
  • identify common shapes
  • sing the alphabet and connect letters to sounds

If you would like to support your child in practicing Spanish, please check out our website at hpselementaryspanish.weebly.com for videos, games, reading suggestions, and information about the countries we focus on as part of our elementary curriculum.

Art

Kindergarten children are classified as explorers in art and learn through daily hands-on experiences. They make discoveries, practice choices, meet problems, and draw conclusions.  Growth comes through manipulation of materials and exposure to art created by others.  Students improve in their motor coordination and their ability to express ideas visually.  The art experience also fosters self-esteem and allows the child to develop a sense of self in relation to the world.  Students completing kindergarten are in the process of acquiring or practicing the following skills and concepts: drawing lines and objects; using color names and appreciating relationships in nature; painting; and exploring multimedia craft projects.

Physical Education

The physical education curriculum is designed to promote the skills and attitudes that are associated with sport, recreation, and good health. The curriculum is presented through individual, partner, group, and team experiences. Major themes for study include: movement; ball skills; games; recreational or leisure time activities; sports; and physical fitness. Subjects for study include: locomotor skills (run, skip, hop, etc.); ball skills (throw, catch, kick, etc.); low organization games such as tag and parachute play; lead-up sports such as tumbling, bowling, and gym hockey; and fitness, health, and sportsmanship.

Music

The music program provides kindergarten children with an opportunity to develop their aesthetic sensitivities. Basic music cognitive skills, gross motor skills, and attitudes are reinforced and extended throughout the program. Stories and literature which can be sung and dramatized are used, especially songs which are integrated with seasonal or project themes to establish connections between music and other core curriculum disciplines.

Computer Science

The kindergarten computer science curriculum is intended to explore concepts and skills that enable the students to use available hardware and applications. Instruction is integrated using online resources as well as computer-based applications to support literacy and mathematical development.

Library/Media

Kindergarten students visit the library regularly for formal instruction and book selection.  Students will learn about the organization of the library and book care and will be introduced to how books are shelved.  Students will also participate in story telling, discussion sessions, and peer sharing opportunities.

Additional information

Questions about grade level curriculum should be directed first to your child’s teacher. The principal or assistant principal may provide additional information.

Kindergarten

East Elementary

Foster Elementary

Plymouth River Elementary

South Elementary

Superintendent’s Office

Comments about this information may be directed to your child’s building principal or the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James M. LaBillois at [email protected] or 781-741-1500.

Grade 1

Grade 1 Curriculum Summary

These curriculum summaries have been developed by teachers and administrators to serve as another way of communicating with parents. They highlight the core curriculum and expectations for student learning at each grade level.

The curriculum summaries describe what most students at a grade level are expected to know and be able to do by the end of the school year. They also reflect the goals of the various Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. It is important to note that although children may learn and grow at different rates and through varied styles, all should make regular progress.

While we have high expectations for all students and encourage each student to work to their capacity, parents and teachers recognize that some students have more difficulty in school. Others will progress more rapidly and move well beyond these core expectations. It is the joint responsibility of school and home to provide support, challenge, and encouragement for all students.

Reading/Language Arts

The first grade reading/language arts program stresses a continuum of skills and strategies necessary for beginning reading and writing. Core instruction is delivered through the 2017 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Journeys Reading Program, components of which include instruction in phonological awareness, phonics and decoding, comprehension, vocabulary, study skills, and writing (including grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling.) Beginning reading concepts are enhanced by attention to skills in listening, speaking, viewing and representing. The core anthology is supplemented by numerous print and digital resources that assist students in the development of close reading and analysis skills. Teachers also integrate reading with content areas such as science, math, and social studies. Key concepts are presented to students in whole-class format while Response to Intervention (RTI) practices allow individual needs to be met in small skill-based groups. Students are assessed using DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) in order to identify necessary and appropriate intervention techniques. District-wide common assessments monitor student progress in skills indicated by both the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework and the core reading program. Students continue their exploration of the primary forms of writing in the expository, opinion, and narrative modes. Grade 1 students will follow a handwriting program to learn upper and lower case vertical manuscript letters, following four simple, continuous strokes.

Social Studies

The grade 1 social studies curriculum is aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for History/Social Science, as well as English Language Arts and Literacy. It begins with focusing on the family, school, and the community at large. Children explore the various roles of people in these settings. Continued understanding of seasonal changes is combined with problem solving and critical thinking while analyzing such information as the effects of regional temperatures and rainfall. Included in the curriculum is the exploration of American freedom fighters, inventors, heroes, and leaders, as well as the diverse and important role of women. Celebrations continue to be a key component of understanding the diversity of cultures. The meaning of citizenship in relation to school, the community, and the nation is an integral part of the study of our national symbols. Included in this concept is the importance of caring for the Earth. Throughout this curriculum, children compare and contrast the past and the present, focusing first on their immediate environment and then expanding to the larger community, and, ultimately, to the world at large. Mapping skills are a key component of this curriculum, and timelines are used to assist in the understanding of the progression of events and to better understand the concept of past and present.  Whenever possible, social studies will be taught in an integrated manner with science, mathematics, language arts, and reading. In particular, teachers will utilize picture books, historical fiction and other trade books to thematically connect literacy to social studies.

Science

Grade 1 students take an inquiry approach to understand the power of patterns to predict events in the natural and designed world. Throughout the year, students will make observations of the seasons and sky, noting relationships among seasonal patterns of change and the cyclical pattern of movement of the sun, moon and stars.  Building on the natural curiosity that young children have about plants and animals, Grade 1 students will explore adaptations of living things, recognizing that animals use their body parts and senses in different ways to see, hear, grasp objects, protect themselves, move from place to place, and seek, find, and take in food, water, and air.  Grade 1 students will also observe and experiment with basic properties of energy, with a focus on light and sound. Class time may be used for teacher presentations, student sharing, videos, hands-on activities and experiments, and interest-centered experiences. Engineering design challenges are integrated to provide opportunities for students to apply science content. Science at this level is often integrated with literature and social studies. 

Mathematics

The curriculum of the Hingham Public Schools is aligned with and based on the 2011 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics, based on the Common Core State Standards. Hingham uses the Everyday Mathematics Program (Wright Group) as its primary tool to teach the mathematics curriculum.

First grade Everyday Mathematics content emphasizes the following:

Number Sense – counting; reading and writing and modeling whole numbers; investigating whole number place-value; exploring fractions; using ordinal numbers.

Computation – learning addition and subtraction facts and exploring fact families; beginning informal work with properties of numbers and operations; exploring the values of coin combinations.

Patterns & Relations – exploring attributes, patterns, sequences, relations, and functions; finding missing numbers and rules in Frames-and-Arrows and “What’s My Rule?” problems.

Measurement/Geometry – using tools to measure length and weight; using clocks, calendars, timelines, and thermometers; exploring 2- and 3-dimensional shapes.

Data & Chance – collecting, organizing and displaying data using tally charts, tables, line plots and graphs.

Hingham believes that concept mastery comes over a period of time, first through informal exposure and then through more formal and directed instruction. Teachers utilize a combination of whole group instruction, small group activities and individual learning experiences. Student progress is assessed using ongoing and formal unit assessments.

Foreign  Language

The objective of the elementary Spanish program is to create a foundation from which students can develop basic communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as an appreciation for the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will acquire vocabulary that is useful in their everyday world,  learn conversational phrases and expressions in context, develop an understanding of the Spanish alphabet and phonetic system, and  be well-prepared to study Spanish or French at the middle school. 

In 1st grade, our students will learn to:

  • introduce themselves and others
  • say how they feel and ask others about their feelings
  • count from 0-20
  • identify the days of the week and months of the year
  • give today’s date
  • identify common animals
  • say what they have or do not have

If you would like to support your child in practicing Spanish, please check out our website at hpselementaryspanish.weebly.com for videos, games, reading suggestions, and information about the countries we focus on as part of our elementary curriculum.

Art

First grade students are scheduled for art at least once in each six-day cycle. The focus of the curriculum is on developing skills by using a variety of materials and media. Students are introduced to the elements and principles of art and design such as color, line, texture, shape, form, pattern, value, space and composition. They create artwork from observation and imagination while focusing on creative expression. Students begin to exercise critical thinking skills, responding to their own work and cultural art forms. While personal connections to students’ own experiences are stressed, an emphasis is placed on integration with classroom themes and core curriculum objectives. Evaluation in first grade is based on students’ level of independence in completing art objectives.

Music

Students in grade 1 are scheduled for classroom music at least once in each six-day cycle. Instruction is interactive and students will learn to: sing as a basis for the curriculum; move to a beat; dance to music; respond to recorded examples; appreciate all styles of music; participate in music-related games; and develop their ability to sing in tune. Wherever appropriate, instruction will provide opportunities to make connections between music and literature, social studies, science, mathematics, and other disciplines.

Physical Education

The physical education curriculum is an activity-based program designed to promote the proper skills and attitudes that are associated with sport, recreation, and good health. The curriculum is presented through individual, partner, group, and team experiences. Major themes for study include: movement; games; recreational or leisure time activities; sports; and physical fitness. Primary grade (K-3) instruction is presented through one or more 40 minute classes in each six-day cycle. Topics for study include: locomotor skills (run, skip, hop, etc.); low organization games; lead-up sports; health; and sportsmanship. Students are expected to show age-appropriate development in both skill and understanding.

Computer Science

Students are introduced to various age-appropriate technologies and applications that enhance learning in areas such as counting, understanding math families, phonics, writing sentences and drawing.  In addition, students experience activities using introductory programming and coding, introductory word processing skills, and develop simple keyboard familiarity.

Library/Media

Students in grade 1 visit the library regularly for both formal instruction and book selection which includes read-aloud, discussion sessions, and peer sharing opportunities.  The library media objectives include: introducing resources, procedures, and rules of the library media center; understanding the parts of a book (cover, title page, etc.); understanding terms (author, illustrator, fiction, etc.); understanding picture book shelving scheme (alphabetical to the first letter); exemplary authors and illustrators; Caldecott Awards; and easy nonfiction  books through storytelling and activities.

Health/Social-Emotional Development

Primary grade instruction (1-3) involves formal classes as well as informal responses to incidents or related curriculum references (“teachable moments”).  Typical subjects for study include: daily hygiene; disease prevention; safety and injury prevention; and physical, social and emotional health. The study of health focuses on the individual, the family, and the community.  The major themes are: health habits; safety; nutrition; and drug  safety.  Social and emotional health is taught using the Toolbox program designed to develop self-regulation and social-emotional skills in students.  Students also participate in the Second Step program which includes lessons on empathy, impulse control and problem solving, and anger management.  Class time is used for teacher presentation, class discussions and student projects.

Suggestions For Parent Assistance

  • Develop good nutrition, rest, exercise, and safety habits.
  • Work with the school to develop good study skills and self-discipline.
  • Show an active interest in your child’s daily school activities.
  • Help your child to select materials and ideas from home which contribute to class activities and discussions.
  • Plan family experiences which support topics studied at school.
  • Encourage your child to pursue individual interests such as hobbies, arts, and athletics.
  • Volunteer in your child’s school and attend individual conferences and school events.
  • Consult with the classroom teacher about specific ways to help your child.
  • Provide a place and time for your child to complete homework assignments comfortably and on time.
  • Assist your child with the completion and review of homework, but ensure the final product is reflective of the child’s understanding of the assignment.
  • Foster an interest in reading by reading regularly to and with your child.

Evaluation

At grade 1, student progress reports are issued twice per year. There is no standardized testing component at this level, but curriculum and assessment activities do reflect goals that will be evaluated as part of the next-generation Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS 2.0) testing in later grades. Students are assessed using DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) in order to identify necessary and appropriate intervention techniques to help children achieve given benchmarks. Literacy portfolios and math folders contain samples of classroom assessments and other student work.

For more information

Questions about grade level curriculum should be directed first to your child’s teacher. The principal or assistant principal may provide additional information.

East Elementary

Foster Elementary

Plymouth River Elementary

South Elementary

Superintendent’s OfficeComments about this information may be directed to your child’s building principal or the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James M. LaBillois at [email protected] or 781-741-1500.

Grade 2

Grade 2 Curriculum Summary

These curriculum summaries have been developed by teachers and administrators to serve as another way of communicating with parents. They highlight the core curriculum and expectations for student learning at each grade level.

The curriculum summaries describe what most students at a grade level are expected to know and be able to do by the end of the school year. They also reflect the goals of the various Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. It is important to note that although children may learn and grow at different rates and through varied styles, all should make regular progress.

While we have high expectations for all students and encourage each student to work to their capacity, parents and teachers recognize that some students have more difficulty in school. Others will progress more rapidly and move well beyond these core expectations. It is the joint responsibility of school and home to provide support, challenge, and encouragement for all students.

Reading/Language Arts

The second grade reading/language arts program stresses a continuum of skills and strategies to further develop the literacy skills and strategies introduced in first grade. Core instruction is delivered through the 2017 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Journeys Reading Program, key components of which include instruction in phonics and decoding, fluency, comprehension vocabulary, study skills, and writing (including grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling.) Continued attention is given to skills in listening, speaking, viewing and representing. The core anthology is supplemented by numerous print and digital resources that assist students in the development of close reading and analysis skills. Teachers also integrate reading with content areas such as science, math, and social studies. Key concepts are presented to students in whole-class format while Response to Intervention (RTI) practices allow individual needs to be met in small skill-based groups. Students are assessed using DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) in order to identify necessary and appropriate intervention techniques. District-wide common assessments monitor student progress in skills indicated by both the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks  and the core reading program. The writing process is taught through direct instruction in the Empowering Writers program in order to meet state and local standards for writing in the expository, opinion, and narrative modes. In the fall grade 2 students will review manuscript letters. After Thanksgiving teachers will begin to introduce cursive writing with primary focus on lower case letters.

Social Studies

The grade 2 social studies curriculum is aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for History/Social Science, as well as the English Language Arts and Literacy. The chief purpose of the grade 2 curriculum is to help students understand that American citizenship embraces all kinds of people, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and national origin. Second graders learn world and United States history, geography, economics, and government by studying more about who Americans are and where they came from. They explore their own family’s history and learn about distinctive achievements, customs, events, places, or landmarks from long ago and from around the world.  Physical, economic, and human geography are integrated into the curriculum to provide a basic understanding of how transportation and communication systems help bring people together at local, national, and international levels. Class time may be used for teacher presentations, student sharing, videos, hands-on activities, experiments, and interest-centered experiences.  Guest speakers and special field trips also provide incentives for special projects.  Whenever possible, social studies will be taught in an integrated manner with science, mathematics, language arts, and reading. Teachers will utilize picture books, historical fiction and other trade books to thematically connect literacy to social studies.

Science

Grade 2 students take an inquiry approach to explore systems and investigate how parts relate to the whole. In Grade 2, students learn that water is found everywhere on Earth and takes different forms and shapes. They map landforms and bodies of water and observe that flowing water and wind shape these landforms. Students move from observing the structures of individual plants and animals to considering the environments in which plants and animals live. They investigate how plants and animals depend on their surroundings (including food, water, and shelter) and other living things to meet their needs. Grade 2 students use their observation skills gained in earlier grades to classify materials based on similar properties and functions. They test different materials and analyze data to determine which materials are the best for a specific function. Class time is typically devoted to hands-on activities followed by discussions to help students gain an understanding of important concepts. Engineering design challenges are integrated to provide opportunities for students to apply science content. Science at this level is often integrated with literature and social studies. 

Mathematics

The curriculum of the Hingham Public Schools is aligned with and based on the 2017 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics.  Hingham uses the Everyday Mathematics Program (Wright Group) as its primary tool to teach the mathematics curriculum.

Second grade Everyday Mathematics content emphasizes the following:

Numeration – counting; reading, writing & modeling whole numbers; place-value; comparing numbers; working with fractions; using money to develop place-value and decimal concepts.

Operations & Computation – addition and subtraction facts; adding and subtracting with tens and hundreds; making estimates; beginning multiplication and division; calculating values of coin and bill combinations.

Patterns, Functions & Algebra – exploring patterns and rules; relations between numbers and attributes. Geometry – exploring 2- and 3-dimensional shapes; classifying polygons.

Measurement – using tools to measure length, weight and temperature; U.S. customary and metric measurement units; clocks & calendars.

Data & Chance – collecting, organizing and interpreting data using tables, charts, line plots and graphs.

Hingham believes that concept mastery comes over a period of time, first through informal exposure and then through more formal and directed instruction.  Teachers utilize a combination of whole group instruction, small group activities and individual learning experiences.  Student progress is assessed using ongoing and formal unit assessments. Students have the opportunity to participate in Continental Math League (CML) contest exams.

Foreign Language

The objective of the elementary Spanish program is to create a foundation from which students can develop basic communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as an appreciation for the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will acquire vocabulary that is useful in their everyday world,  learn conversational phrases and expressions in context, develop an understanding of the Spanish alphabet and phonetic system, and  be well-prepared to study Spanish or French at the middle school. 

In 2nd grade, our students will learn to:

  • count from 0-40
  • identify parts of the body
  • identify and describe family members
  • describe the weather
  • describe what someone is wearing

If you would like to support your child in practicing Spanish, please check out our website at hpselementaryspanish.weebly.com for videos, games, reading suggestions, and information about the countries we focus on as part of our elementary curriculum.

Art

Second grade students are scheduled for art at least once in each six-day cycle.  The focus of the curriculum is on practicing skills introduced in first grade by using a variety of two and three dimensional materials and media.  Students continue to use the elements and principles of art and design.  They cultivate experiences in primary and secondary colors, line qualities, varieties of textures, and pattern while continuing to use shape, space, and composition.  Visual rhythm and movement are introduced.  Students create artwork from observation and imagination and begin to explore abstraction.  Students continue to respond critically by comparing and contrasting the similarities and differences in works of art, materials, and techniques.  An emphasis is placed on integration with classroom themes and core curriculum objectives.  Evaluation is based on students’ level of independence in completing art objectives.

Music

Students in grade 2 are scheduled for classroom music at least once in each six-day cycle.  Instruction is interactive and students will learn to: sing as a basis for the curriculum; move to a beat; dance to music; understand simple music notation; appreciate all styles of music; participate in music-related games; and learn to match pitch on a consistent basis.  Wherever appropriate, instruction will provide opportunities to make connections between music and literature, science, mathematics, and other disciplines.

Physical Education

The physical education curriculum is an activity-based program designed to promote the proper skills and attitudes that are associated with sport, recreation, and good health.  The curriculum is presented through individual, partner, group, and team experiences.  Major themes for study include: movement; games; recreational or leisure time activities; sports; and physical fitness.  Primary grade (K-3) instruction is presented through one or more 40 minute classes in each six-day cycle.  Topics for study include: locomotor skills (run, skip, hop, etc.); low organization games; lead-up sports; health; and sportsmanship.  Students are expected to show age-appropriate development in both skill and understanding.

Computer Science

Students will continue to develop the skills necessary to use age-appropriate technologies as they begin Internet use for research and critical thinking. Responsible use of technology through school rules for safe and ethical Internet use will be addressed.  In addition, students will continue to expand their basic programming and coding skills and work to learn introductory keyboarding skills using two hands, then beginner word processing skills will be introduced.

Library/Media

Students in grade 2 visit the library regularly for both formal instruction and book selection which includes read-aloud, discussion sessions, and peer sharing opportunities.  The library media objectives include: review and reinforcement of skills learned K-1; introduction to fiction shelving scheme; exemplary authors and illustrators; understanding the difference between fiction and nonfiction books and call numbers; introduction to fairy tales, easy reader chapter books, and age-appropriate book selection; using basic reference skills and resources such as dictionaries and encyclopedias; introduction to using electronic references and the library’s online catalog.

Health/Social-Emotional Development

Primary grade instruction (1-3) involves formal classes as well as informal responses to incidents or related curriculum references (“teachable moments”).  Typical subjects for study include: daily hygiene; disease prevention; safety and injury prevention; and physical, social and emotional health.  Social and emotional health is taught using the Second Step program which includes lessons on empathy, impulse control and problem solving, and anger management.  The major themes are: health habits; safety; nutrition; drug safety; and social and emotional health.  Class time is used for teacher presentation, class discussions, and  student projects. Social and emotional health is taught using the Toolbox program designed to develop self-regulation and social-emotional skills in students

Suggestions For Parent Assistance

  • Develop good nutritional, rest, exercise, and safety habits.
  • Work with the school to develop good study skills and self-discipline.
  • Show an active interest in your child’s daily school activities.
  • Help your child to select materials and ideas from home which contribute to class activities and discussions.
  • Plan family experiences which support topics studied at school.
  • Encourage your child to pursue individual interests such as hobbies, arts, and athletics.
  • Volunteer in your child’s school and attend individual conferences and school events.
  • Consult with the classroom teacher about specific ways to help your child.
  • Provide a place and time for your child to complete homework assignments comfortably and on time.
  • Assist your child with the completion and review of homework, but ensure the final product is reflective of the child’s understanding of the assignment.
  • Foster an interest in reading by reading regularly to and with your child.

Assessment

At grade 2, student progress reports are issued twice per year.  There is no standardized testing component at this level, but curriculum and assessment activities do reflect goals that will be evaluated as part of the next-generation Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS 2.0) testing in later grades.  Students are assessed using DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) in order to identify necessary and appropriate intervention techniques to help children achieve given benchmarks.  Literacy portfolios and math folders contain samples of classroom assessments and other student work.

For more information

Questions about grade level curriculum should be directed first to your child’s teacher. The principal or assistant principal may provide additional information.

East Elementary

Foster Elementary

Plymouth River Elementary

South Elementary

Superintendent’s Office

Comments about this information may be directed to your child’s building principal or the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James M. LaBillois at [email protected] or 781-741-1500.

Grade 3

Grade 3 Curriculum Summary

These curriculum summaries have been developed by teachers and administrators to serve as another way of communicating with parents. They highlight the core curriculum and expectations for student learning at each grade level.

The curriculum summaries describe what most students at a grade level are expected to know and be able to do by the end of the school year. They also reflect the goals of the various Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. It is important to note that although children may learn and grow at different rates and through varied styles, all should make regular progress.

While we have high expectations for all students and encourage each student to work to their capacity, parents and teachers recognize that some students have more difficulty in school. Others will progress more rapidly and move well beyond these core expectations. It is the joint responsibility of school and home to provide support, challenge, and encouragement for all students.

English/Reading/Language Arts

The third grade reading/language arts program stresses a continuum of skills and strategies to further develop the literacy skills and strategies introduced in second grade. Core instruction is delivered through the 2017 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Journeys Reading Program, key components of which include instruction in phonics and decoding, comprehension, fluency, vocabulary, study skills, and writing (including grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling.) Continued attention is given to skills in listening, speaking, viewing and representing. The core anthology is supplemented by numerous print and digital resources that assist students in the development of close reading and analysis skills. Teachers also integrate reading with content areas such as science, math, and social studies. Key concepts are presented to students in whole-class format while Response to Intervention (RTI) practices allow individual needs to be met in small skill-based groups. Teachers also employ a variety of instructional models and activities to promote the development of fluency and comprehension. The writing process is taught through direct instruction in the Empowering Writers program in order to meet state and local standards for writing in the expository, opinion, and narrative modes. District-wide common assessments monitor student progress in skills indicated by both the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the core reading program. By the end of grade 3, students will have been introduced to all lower-case and upper-case letters in cursive. Over the course of the year, they will be encouraged to practice cursive through their daily work and homework.

Social Studies

The grade 3 social studies curriculum is aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for History/Social Science, as well as the English Language Arts and Literacy. It includes map and globe skills including the identification of the New England states and the geography and topography of Massachusetts. The curriculum also serves as an introduction to Hingham and early United States history. The colonial and revolutionary periods are introduced to students with an emphasis on Native American and colonial cultures. This includes a study of the Wampanoags, which develops an understanding of a particular Native American culture and introduces students to multicultural interactions. An emphasis is also placed on Massachusetts’ involvement in the American Revolution.  Class time is used in various ways, including teacher presentations, student presentations, small group work, projects, hands-on activities, guest speakers, and media presentations.  Whenever possible, social studies will be taught in an integrated manner with science, math, language arts, and reading. Teachers will utilize picture books, historical fiction, and other trade books to thematically connect literacy to social studies.

Science

Grade 3 students take an inquiry approach to develop and sharpen their skills at obtaining, recording, and analyzing data in order to study their environment. Students use hand-made tools and digital resources to analyze “real time” data to determine weather patterns.  Students also summarize information about the climate of different regions of the world to illustrate that typical weather conditions over a year vary by region.  They consider humans’ influence on weather-related events and evaluate the merits of design solutions that reduce the damage caused by weather.  Students explore motion with tools and toys, such as magnets and paper clips, wheel-and-axle systems, paper air twirlers, and rotating tops, and investigate forces including gravity and magnetism.  Students also study the properties of rocks and minerals, conducting a variety of tests to determine distinguishing characteristics and classify rock and mineral samples. Class time is typically devoted to hands-on activities followed by reading and discussions to help students gain an understanding of important concepts. Engineering design challenges are integrated to provide opportunities for students to apply science content. 

Foreign  Language

The objective of the elementary Spanish program is to create a foundation from which students can develop basic communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as an appreciation for the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will acquire vocabulary that is useful in their everyday world,  learn conversational phrases and expressions in context, develop an understanding of the Spanish alphabet and phonetic system, and  be well-prepared to study Spanish or French at the middle school. 

In 3rd grade, our students will learn to:

  • count from 0-60
  • tell when their birthday is and find out when someone else’s birthday is
  • tell someone how they feel
  • find out someone’s age

If you would like to support your child in practicing Spanish, please check out our website at hpselementaryspanish.weebly.com for videos, games, reading suggestions, and information about the countries we focus on as part of our elementary curriculum.

Mathematics

The curriculum of the Hingham Public Schools is aligned with and based on the 2017 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. Hingham uses the Everyday Mathematics Program (Wright Group) as its primary tool to teach the mathematics curriculum.

Third grade Everyday Mathematics content emphasizes the following:

Numeration – counting patterns; place-value; reading, writing and modeling whole numbers up to 1,000,000; fractions, decimals & integers.

Operations & Computation – automaticity with addition and subtraction facts; multi-digit multiplication and division; fractions and money, estimation.

Patterns, Functions & Algebra – number grid, Frames & Arrows, and “What’s My Rule?” activities; relationships between operations; missing parts of number models.

Geometry – exploring 2- and 3-dimensional shapes, other geometric concepts. Measurement – measuring lengths in inches and centimeters; relationships among length and time; areas and perimeters of polygons; time.

Data & Chance– collecting, organizing and interpreting data.

Hingham believes that concept mastery comes over a period of time, first through informal exposure and then through more formal and directed instruction. Teachers utilize a combination of whole group instruction, small group activities and individual learning experiences. Student progress is assessed using ongoing and formal unit assessments, as well as monthly basic fact tests. Students may participate in Continental Math League (CML) contest exams.

Art

Third grade students are scheduled for art at least once in each six-day cycle. The focus of the curriculum is on refining skills, personal expression and understanding the styles, and influences of native cultures. Students strengthen their use of the elements and principles of art and design. They use more sophisticated color schemes, line qualities, visual texture, and pattern while continuing to use shape, space, composition, visual rhythm and movement. Students use observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in creating their artwork. Students are introduced to the processes of artistry, including drafting, revising and exhibiting their work. Students learn to classify artwork into categories such as painting, printmaking, collage, etc. Evaluation in third grade is based on students’ effort, participation and completing lesson objectives.

Music

Students in grade 3 are scheduled for classroom music at least once in each six-day cycle.  Additional instruction is provided so that students learn to play the soprano recorder as an instrument.  Instruction is interactive and students will: build on music skills from grade 2; solidify the ability to count rhythms; explore music notation through musical composition; sing melodies accurately and sing rounds and understand the concept of harmony; perform partner songs; understand ABA and rondo forms; and recognize some instruments by sound.  Whenever appropriate, instruction will provide opportunities to make connections between music and literature, science, mathematics, and other disciplines.

Physical Education

The physical education curriculum is an activity-based program designed to promote the proper skills and attitudes that are associated with sport, recreation, and good health.  The curriculum is presented through individual, partner, group, and team experiences.  Major themes for study include: movement; games; recreational or leisure time activities; sports; and physical fitness.  Primary grade (K-3) instruction is presented through one or more 40 minute classes in each six-day cycle.  Topics for study include: locomotor skills (run, skip, hop, etc.); low organization games; lead-up sports; health; and sportsmanship.  Students are expected to show age-appropriate development in both skill and understanding.

Computer Science 

This year’s emphasis is on developing strong word processing skills and increasing keyboard speed and accuracy.  Demonstrated proficiency in these, and other, areas will be tracked throughout the year.  Students further their competence in research by using age-appropriate Internet-based search engines to support their classroom curriculum.  They will continue to develop skills using the engineering design process to program and code simple machines and devices and will begin to use spreadsheets to collect and graph information.

Library/Media

Students in grade 3 visit the library for both formal library instruction and book selection which includes read-aloud, discussion sessions, and peer sharing opportunities.  Students may also use the library for research for class assignments and projects.  The library media objectives include: review and reinforcement of skills learned K-2; reviewing organization and rules for use of the library/media center; understanding parts of a book including glossary and bibliographies; using general encyclopedias; using the online catalog; and developing searching strategies for research.

Health/Social-Emotional Development

Primary grade instruction (1-3) involves formal classes as well as informal responses to incidents or related curriculum references (“teachable moments”).  Typical subjects for study include: daily hygiene; disease prevention; safety and injury prevention; and physical, social and emotional health. The study of health focuses on the individual, the family, and the community.  The major themes are: health habits; safety; nutrition; drug safety; social and emotional health; and smoking prevention.  Class time is used for teacher presentation, class discussions, and  student projects. Social and emotional health is taught using the Toolbox program designed to develop self-regulation and social-emotional skills in students

Suggestions For Parent Assistance

  • Develop good nutrition, rest, exercise, and safety habits.
  • Work with the school to develop good study skills and self-discipline.
  • Show an active interest in your child’s daily school activities.
  • Help your child to select materials and ideas from home which contribute to class activities and discussions.
  • Plan family experiences which support topics studied at school.
  • Encourage your child to pursue individual interests such as hobbies, arts, and athletics.
  • Volunteer in your child’s school and attend individual conferences and school events.
  • Consult with the classroom teacher about specific ways to help your child.
  • Provide a place and time for your child to complete homework assignments comfortably and on time.
  • Assist your child with the completion and review of homework, but ensure the final product is reflective of the child’s understanding of the assignment.
  • Foster an interest in reading by reading regularly to and with your child.

Assessment 

Students in grades 3-5 will participate in the next-generation Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS 2.0). Test batteries in reading and mathematics (grade 3), reading, writing, and mathematics (grade 4), and reading, writing, mathematics, and science (grade 5) will be administered. Report cards document progress, and literacy portfolios and math folders contain samples of student work at all grades.

For more information

Questions about grade level curriculum should be directed first to your child’s teacher. The principal or assistant principal may provide additional information.

East Elementary

Foster Elementary

Plymouth River Elementary

South Elementary

Superintendent’s Office

Comments about this information may be directed to your child’s building principal or the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James M. LaBillois at [email protected] or 781-741-1500.

Grade 4

Grade 4 Curriculum Summary

These curriculum summaries have been developed by teachers and administrators to serve as another way of communicating with parents. They highlight the core curriculum and expectations for student learning at each grade level.

The curriculum summaries describe what most students at a grade level are expected to know and be able to do by the end of the school year. They also reflect the goals of the various Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. It is important to note that although children may learn and grow at different rates and through varied styles, all should make regular progress.

While we have high expectations for all students and encourage each student to work to their capacity, parents and teachers recognize that some students have more difficulty in school. Others will progress more rapidly and move well beyond these core expectations. It is the joint responsibility of school and home to provide support, challenge, and encouragement for all students.

English/Reading/Language Arts

The fourth grade reading/language arts program stresses a continuum of skills and strategies to further develop the literacy skills and strategies introduced in third grade. Core instruction is delivered through the 2017 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Journeys Reading Program, key components of which include instruction in phonics and decoding, comprehension, fluency, vocabulary, study skills, and writing (including grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling.)  Continued attention is given to skills in listening, speaking, viewing and representing.  The core anthology is supplemented by numerous print and digital resources that assist students in the development of close reading and analysis skills. Teachers also integrate reading with content areas such as science, math, and social studies. Key concepts are presented to students in whole-class format while Response to Intervention (RTI) practices allow individual needs to be met in small skill-based groups. Teachers also employ a variety of instructional models and activities to promote the development of fluency and comprehension.  The writing process is taught through direct instruction in the Empowering Writers program in order to meet state and local standards for writing in the expository, opinion, and narrative modes. District-wide common assessments monitor student progress in skills indicated by both the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the core reading program. Over the course of the school year, students will continue to practice cursive handwriting.  

Social Studies

The grade 4 social studies curriculum is aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for History/Social Science, as well as the English Language Arts and Literacy. It lays the foundation for being a global citizen, beginning with a concentration on the geography of the whole planet.  Maps, globes, water, land, and climate are discussed from the point of view of how these affect human culture and history.  The main emphasis of the curriculum is U.S. geography addressed through the study of four key regions of the United States: the Northeast, the South, the Midwest, and the West.  Each region is examined by focusing on such topics as geography, work, living, and citizenship in action.  The geography units culminate with a more global and current events emphasis as students examine challenges that confront people living in today’s world.  As per the Massachusetts History/Social Science Framework, students learn about the geography, culture and history of Canada, with an optional unit on ancient China. This introduces students to a wider global perspective. Students are expected to demonstrate further development of skills and understandings in the following areas:  map and globe skills; decoding and comprehension skills to learn from text and other written material; thinking and discussion skills; and foundational understanding of how language, tools, technology, institutions, and beliefs develop. Class time may be used for teacher presentations, small group work, discussions, hands-on activities, and videos.  Homework is often assigned as part of an integrated project and varies depending on the topic being covered.  Grades are based on classroom participation, formal tests, projects, and map work. Teachers will utilize historical fiction and nonfiction trade books to connect literacy to social studies.

Science

In grade 4, students observe and interpret patterns related to the transfer of matter and energy on Earth, in physical interactions, and in organisms. Students learn about energy—its motion, transfer, and conversion—in different physical contexts. They explore electricity in depth, wiring simple electric circuits, exploring the relationship between electricity and magnetism, and applying their knowledge of electricity and electric circuits to “real world” technology, such as wind turbines.  Grade 4 students use a variety of 2D and 3D models, including maps and stream tables, to interpret patterns of erosion and deposition and infer how landforms are created. Through close study of classroom plants and field specimens, students learn that plants and animals have internal and external structures that support life, growth, behavior, and reproduction.  Class time is typically devoted to hands-on activities followed by reading and discussions to help students gain an understanding of important concepts. Engineering design challenges are integrated to provide opportunities for students to apply science content. 

Mathematics

The curriculum of the Hingham Public Schools is aligned with and based on the 2017 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. Hingham uses the Everyday Mathematics program (Wright Group) as its primary tool to teach the mathematics curriculum. Fourth grade Everyday Mathematics content emphasizes the following: Numeration – reading, writing & comparing integers, whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; relationships between fractions, decimals & percents. Operations & Computation – adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing multi-digit whole numbers and decimals; rounding; adding and subtracting fractions. Patterns, Functions & Algebra – using symbolic, verbal, numerical, and graphical representations; parentheses; creating, extending, and describing patterns and rules. Geometry – classifying lines and angles; coordinate grid; transformations; analyzing 2- and 3-dimensional figures. Measurement – measuring and estimating length, area, volume, weight, temperature, and time; using map scales. Data & Chance – creating, reading and interpreting graphs. Hingham believes that concept mastery comes over a period of time, first through informal exposure and then through more formal and directed instruction. Teachers utilize a combination of whole group instruction, small group activities and individual learning experiences. Student progress is assessed using ongoing and formal unit assessments, as well as monthly basic facts tests. Students may participate in Continental Math League (CML) contest exams. Selected students are invited to participate in a pull-out Math Plus option.

Foreign  Language

The objective of the elementary Spanish program is to create a foundation from which students can develop basic communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as an appreciation for the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will acquire vocabulary that is useful in their everyday world,  learn conversational phrases and expressions in context, develop an understanding of the Spanish alphabet and phonetic system, and  be well-prepared to study Spanish or French at the middle school. 

In 4th grade, our students will learn to:

  • count from 0-80
  • identify Spanish-English cognates
  • talk about things they like and things they have
  • describe their home

If you would like to support your child in practicing Spanish, please check out our website at hpselementaryspanish.weebly.com for videos, games, reading suggestions, and information about the countries we focus on as part of our elementary curriculum.

Art

Grade 4 art is scheduled at least once in each six-day cycle. The curriculum focuses on an emphasis on the styles, influences and roles of artists in ancient cultures. Further sequential instruction using the elements and principles of art and design builds a strong foundation for artistic expression. Students use more sophisticated color schemes, line qualities, visual texture, and pattern while continuing to use shape, space, composition, visual rhythm, and movement. Continued practice with a variety of media and techniques promotes higher level craftsmanship. Students use observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in creating their artwork. They continue to explore artistry. Students compare, contrast and classify art forms. They use this knowledge as a basis for evaluating their own work as well as the work of others. Evaluation in fourth grade is based on students’ effort, participation, craftspersonship, and completing lesson objectives.

Music

Fourth graders are scheduled for classroom music at least once in each six-day cycle. The curriculum continues to provide opportunities to foster and encourage a love of music in students and to develop creative talents and sensitivities and build teamwork with ensemble experiences. Students will: increase music appreciation through exposure to works of famous composers; develop skills in note reading and writing; develop performance skills through singing and playing recorders and Orff instruments; understand music structure including AB, ABA, rondo (ABACA) forms; develop an understanding of rhythm and meter; and use creative movement, drama, and pantomime for expression. Class time is used for teacher presentation, full ensemble practice and performance, cooperative small group practice and performance, and independent note writing and composition.

Physical Education

The physical education curriculum is designed to promote the skills and attitudes that are associated with sports, recreation, and good health.  The curriculum is presented through individual, partner, group, and team experiences.  Major themes for study include: movement, games, sports, physical fitness, and sportsmanship.  Intermediate grade instruction (4-5) moves more towards team sport orientation.  Greater emphasis is placed on skill development, concepts, and the rules and procedures of official sports.  Classes meet at least once in each six-day cycle.  Activities are presented in formal three to four week units.  Evaluation and grading reflect student motivation, participation, sportsmanship, and observation about skill development.

Computer Science 

Skills are incorporated to meet classroom curriculum goals including writing, research and presentation of organizational and analytical data.  Students learn how to use the word processing programs, spreadsheets, presentation software, and will expand their use and application of programming and coding languages. Students will continue to use and expand their use of the Internet.

Library/Media

Students in grade 4 visit the library regularly for both formal instruction and book selection which includes read-aloud, discussion sessions, and peer sharing opportunities. Students may also use the library for research for class assignments and projects.  The library media objectives include:  review and reinforcement of skills learned K-3; introduction to fiction genres; locating materials using nonfiction call numbers; using specialized reference books; outlining and note taking; and online databases.

Health/Social-Emotional Development

The health curriculum is designed to promote an understanding and an awareness of sound health and safety practices. The major themes are: health habits; disease prevention; safety and injury prevention; physical, social and emotional health; and drug, alcohol and violence prevention.  Grade 4 and 5 instruction takes on a more formal approach.  Students participate in the Toolbox program, designed to develop self-regulation and social-emotional skills in students.  Other formal units include topics such as alcohol, smoking and other drug prevention, nutrition and an introductory study of viruses and the immune system are taught.  Attention is given to an increased awareness of students’ own developmental changes.   Grade 4  and 5 students participate in the Steps to Respect Bullying Prevention program.  Class time is used for teacher presentation, class discussions, student projects, and specialist presentations by the nurse or physical education instructors.

Suggestions For Parent Assistance

  • Develop good nutrition, rest, exercise, and safety habits.
  • Work with the school to develop good study skills and self-discipline.
  • Show an active interest in your child’s daily school activities.
  • Help your child to select materials and ideas from home which contribute to class activities and discussions.
  • Plan family experiences that support topics studied at school.
  • Encourage your child to pursue individual interests such as hobbies, arts, and athletics.
  • Volunteer in your child’s school and attend individual conferences and school events.
  • Consult with the classroom teacher about specific ways to help your child.
  • Provide a place and time for your child to complete homework assignments comfortably and on time.
  • Assist your child with the completion and review of homework, but ensure the final product is reflective of the child’s understanding of the assignment.
  • Foster an interest in reading by reading regularly to and with your child.

Assessment

Students in grades 3-5 will participate in the next-generation Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS 2.0). Test batteries in reading and mathematics (grade 3), reading, writing, and mathematics (grade 4), and reading, writing, mathematics, and science (grade 5) will be administered. Report cards document progress, and literacy portfolios and math folders contain samples of student work at all grades.

For more information

Questions about grade level curriculum should be directed first to your child’s teacher. The principal or assistant principal may provide additional information.

East Elementary

Foster Elementary

Plymouth River Elementary

South Elementary

Superintendent’s Office

Comments about this information may be directed to your child’s building principal or the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James M. LaBillois at [email protected] or 781-741-1500.

Grade 5

Grade 5 Curriculum Summary

These curriculum summaries have been developed by teachers and administrators to serve as another way of communicating with parents. They highlight the core curriculum and expectations for student learning at each grade level.

The curriculum summaries describe what most students at a grade level are expected to know and be able to do by the end of the school year. They also reflect the goals of the various Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. It is important to note that although children may learn and grow at different rates and through varied styles, all should make regular progress.

While we have high expectations for all students and encourage each student to work to their capacity, parents and teachers recognize that some students have more difficulty in school. Others will progress more rapidly and move well beyond these core expectations. It is the joint responsibility of school and home to provide support, challenge, and encouragement for all students.

English/Reading/Language Arts

The fifth grade reading/language arts program stresses a continuum of skills and strategies to further develop the literacy skills and strategies introduced in fourth grade.  Core instruction is delivered through the 2017 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Journeys Reading Program, key components of which include instruction in phonics and decoding, comprehension, fluency, vocabulary, study skills, and writing (including grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling.)  Continued attention is given to skills in listening, speaking, viewing and representing.  The core anthology is supplemented by numerous print and digital resources that assist students in the development of close reading and analysis skills. Teachers also integrate reading with content areas such as science, math, and social studies.  Key concepts are presented to students in whole-class format while individual needs are met in small skill-based groups. Teachers also employ a variety of instructional models and activities to promote the development of fluency and comprehension.  The writing process is taught through direct instruction in the Empowering Writers program in order to meet state and local standards for writing in the expository, opinion, and narrative modes. District-wide common assessments monitor student progress in skills indicated by both the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the core reading program.  Most students in grade 5 will become more comfortable and proficient in the use of cursive for written expression.

Social Studies

The grade 5 social studies curriculum is aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for History/Social Science, as well as the English Language Arts and Literacy. As per the state framework, it is the students’ first sequential and in-depth study of the United States. The growth of the United States from pre-colonial times through the formation of the United States and the adoption of the Constitution is emphasized. Local history is also incorporated. Current events are woven in by the use of newspapers, periodicals, or other news reports. Students are expected to demonstrate  further development of skills and comprehension in: map and globe use; graphing and charting; content area reading; critical thinking; written discussion; and a foundational understanding of their national heritage.  Class time may be used for teacher presentations, but there is an emphasis on student-centered learning.  Field trips are taken to view local historical sites.  Homework is assigned on a regular basis and is part of student assessment along with grades based on projects, formal testing, and classroom participation. Teachers will utilize historical fiction and nonfiction trade books to connect literacy to social studies.

Science

The grade 5 science program emphasizes scientific inquiry and science literacy, and stresses the interconnectedness of science disciplines. In grade 5, students provide evidence to support arguments and use models and data to describe relationships among systems in the natural world. They use a particle model of matter to explain common phenomena and make observations and measurements to describe properties of pure substances and mixtures. They conduct experiments to explore new properties arising from chemical reactions.  Students study the relationships between Earth and other nearby objects in the solar system and use models to communicate their understanding of patterns such as cycles of day and night and apparent position of objects in the sky. They explore the cycling of water through Earth’s systems and identify human practices that impact the use of natural resources. Students learn about the relationships among plants and animals in ecosystems and how matter and energy are cycled through them. Class time is typically devoted to hands-on activities followed by reading and discussions to help students gain an understanding of important concepts. Engineering design challenges are integrated to provide opportunities for students to apply science content. In addition to daily science lessons with the classroom teacher, grade 5 students also meet once per six-day cycle with our district elementary science specialist for hands-on investigations, nature walks, and field studies that reinforce concepts in the 5th grade curriculum.

Mathematics

The curriculum of the Hingham Public Schools is aligned with and based on the 2011 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. Hingham uses the Everyday Mathematics Program (Wright Group) as its primary tool to teach the mathematics curriculum. Fifth grade Everyday Mathematics content emphasizes the following: Numeration – reading, writing and comparing negative numbers, fractions, whole numbers; powers of 10; prime, composite and square numbers. Operations and Computation – using algorithms to add, subtract, multiply and divide multi-digit whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; prime factoring; converting between fractions, decimals and percents; least common multiples and greatest common factors. Patterns, Functions and Algebra – simple algebraic expressions; rules for patterns; direct proportions; rate problems. Geometry – angle relationships and construction; defining triangles; coordinate geometry; translations; perimeter, area and volume problems. Measurement – measuring and estimating length, area, volume, weight and capacity; converting common units of measurement. Data and Chance – drawing and interpreting data. Hingham believes that concept mastery comes over a period of time, first through informal exposure and then through more formal and directed instruction. Teachers utilize a combination of whole group instruction, small group activities and individual learning experiences. Student progress is assessed using ongoing and formal unit assessments, as well as monthly basic facts tests. Students have the opportunity to participate in Continental Math League (CML) contest exams. Selected students are invited to participate in a pull-out Math Plus option.

Foreign  Language

The objective of the elementary Spanish program is to create a foundation from which students can develop basic communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as an appreciation for the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will acquire vocabulary that is useful in their everyday world,  learn conversational phrases and expressions in context, develop an understanding of the Spanish alphabet and phonetic system, and  be well-prepared to study Spanish or French at the middle school. 

In 5th grade, our students will learn to:

  • count from 0-100
  • describe people by matching the gender and number of nouns and adjectives
  • talk about what they like and what they want
  • identify fruits in Spanish
  • describe what they eat in a typical meal and when they eat it

If you would like to support your child in practicing Spanish, please check out our website at hpselementaryspanish.weebly.com for videos, games, reading suggestions, and information about the countries we focus on as part of our elementary curriculum.

Art

Grade 5 students are scheduled for art at least once in each six-day cycle. Students begin to create unified compositions that demonstrate their understanding of the elements and principles of art and design. They expand their repertoire of 2D and 3D art processes, techniques, and materials with a focus on the range of art effects possible within each medium. Students use observation, abstraction, expression, and symbolic imagery which demonstrates personal invention and/or conveys ideas and emotions. Students assess and reflect upon their work while continuing to explore artistry and personal aesthetics. Students learn to interpret the meanings of artistic works by evaluating how the subject matter reflects the culture and belief system of a society. Evaluation in fifth grade is based on students’ effort, participation, craftspersonship, and completing lesson objectives.

Music

Fifth graders elect to study and perform in band, strings, or chorus.  Students in all ensembles will develop proper basic playing/singing technique, musical expression, note reading, and the ability to perform alone and with others.  Repertoire will be age and skill appropriate, designed to foster skill development while engaging students in meaningful artistic expression.

Physical Education

The physical education curriculum is designed to promote the skills and attitudes that are associated with sports, recreation, and good health.  The curriculum is presented through individual, partner, group, and team experiences.  Major themes for study include: movement, games, sports, physical fitness, and sportsmanship.  Intermediate grade instruction (4-5) moves more towards team sport orientation.  Greater emphasis is placed on skill development, concepts, and the rules and procedures of official sports.  Classes meet at least once in each six-day cycle.  Activities are presented in formal three to four week units.  Evaluation and grading reflect student motivation, participation, sportsmanship, and observation about skill development.

Computer Science 

Students are taught Internet use, research skills, multimedia and productivity tools that will enable them to support the grade 5 project-based curriculum.  Computer programming and coding skills are expanded and will extend the student’s knowledge of fundamental programming concepts such as variables, loops and conditional statements.  Cybersafety and online bullying prevention are reinforced with web-based lessons and discussion. Use of Chromebooks and Google products are heavily used to prepare students for middle school.

Library/Media

Students in grade 5 visit the library for  both formal instruction and book selection which includes read-aloud, discussion sessions, and peer sharing opportunities.  Students may also use the library for research for class assignments and projects.  The library media objectives include: review and reinforcement of skills learned K-4; using a variety of electronic, online, and print resources; develop information processing, location, interpretation, outlining, and note taking skills; develop presentation skills; and introduction to media literacy in order  to improve critical  viewing and listening skills.

Health/Social-Emotional Development

The health curriculum is designed to promote an understanding and an awareness of sound health and safety practices. The major themes are: health habits; disease prevention; safety and injury prevention; physical, social and emotional health; and drug, alcohol and violence prevention.  Grade 4 and 5 instruction takes on a more formal approach.  Grade 4 and 5 instruction takes on a more formal approach.  Students participate in the Toolbox program, designed to develop self-regulation and social-emotional skills in students.  Other formal units include topics such as alcohol, smoking and other drug prevention, nutrition and an introductory study of viruses and the immune system are taught.  Attention is given to an increased awareness of students’ own developmental changes.   Grade 4 and 5 students participate in the Steps to Respect Bullying Prevention program.  Class time is used for teacher presentation, class discussions, student projects, and specialist presentations by the nurse, DARE officer, or physical education instructors.

Suggestions For Parent Assistance

  • Develop good nutrition, rest, exercise, and safety habits.
  • Work with the school to develop good study skills and self-discipline.
  • Show an active interest in your child’s daily school activities.
  • Help your child to select materials and ideas from home which contribute to class activities and discussions.
  • Plan family experiences which support topics studied at school.
  • Encourage your child to pursue individual
  • interests such as hobbies, arts, and athletics.
  • Volunteer in your child’s school and attend individual conferences and school events.
  • Consult with the classroom teacher about specific ways to help your child.
  • Provide a place and time for your child
  • to complete homework assignments comfortably and on time.
  • Assist your child with the completion and review of homework, but ensure the final product is reflective of the child’s understanding of the assignment.
  • Foster an interest in reading by reading regularly to and with your child.

Assessment

Students in grades 3-5 will participate in the next-generation Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS 2.0). Test batteries in reading and mathematics (grade 3), reading, writing, and mathematics (grade 4), and reading, writing, mathematics, and science (grade 5) will be administered. Report cards document progress, and literacy portfolios and math folders contain samples of student work at all grades.

For more information

Questions about grade level curriculum should be directed first to your child’s teacher. The principal or assistant principal may provide additional information.

East Elementary

Foster Elementary

Plymouth River Elementary

South Elementary

Superintendent’s OfficeComments about this information may be directed to your child’s building principal or the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Dr. James M. LaBillois at [email protected] or 781-741-1500.